Out of Touch

For too many years eyes have been down, conversations are few, and rarely a sound. Laughing or crying hitting “share” on a screen~we’ve hitched harmony with humans transmitted ~not seen.

Humans are walking alone in a crowd, shoulder to shoulder they stand, yet their heads mostly bowed. Not a prayer, not a mumble, but maybe a nod~ an occasional “Hello”, our communication seems flawed.

“Social distancing” may mean our normal is frayed~every move, every step, has to be weighed. Yet we sit all alone fused to our only device, thinking “how worse can this get?” listening to media’s advice.

Our spirits will rise seeing kindness and grace~despite the empty shelves and the panic, and the smallness of space. You’re buckled to loved ones, now what will you do? A forced isolation just may be the glue.

All mustered together feeling the sting, a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing. I’ll fasten my faith and harness my hope, with God on my side, it’s much easier to cope.

As immunity increases will we remember the days? Gatherings certainly existed and not just on Sunday’s. Put down the electronics and extend a hand, let’s listen to one another, and try to understand.

Disasters have happened since the beginning of time, although new and mysterious, I won’t shift my paradigm. I’ll tighten my trust and breathe in fresh air~check on my neighbors, and show others I care.

With Spring in the forecast and hope all around, please pray for humanity~a new bond will be found. Let’s garner our grit and talk about faith~close the gap that’s between us and meet face-to-face.

Perhaps we were already isolated~even in huge crowds. When the words of my poem came to me this morning, after prayer and meditation, I thought of the “irony” of isolation. There are so many times I witness distraction. Many people just exist as if “in a daze”. Families that would go out to eat would just sit with little conversation and most would be using their cell phones. No, this is not the case for everyone. But I see our social skills declining in certain situations. Social distancing isn’t really “new” in regards to how we’re “out of touch” with humanity at times. Maybe by social distancing we may become “in touch”.

Please allow me to switch gears to share a bit about my area. Living in a tourist area is definitely interesting. Today, after distancing myself in the woods, I wanted to “investigate” the vibe of our area during this unprecedented time. Although famous for its live entertainment (and not just country music folks), the Branson area was best known for the novel “Shepherd of the Hills” written in 1907 by Harold Bell Wright (http://www.branson.com/learn/general-branson-info/branson-facts) Typically by spring break, 76 Country Boulevard (as known to many of us as the Branson “Strip”) is jam-packed with cars. No, it was not bumper-to-bumper, BUT THERE WERE STILL MANY! If you are looking for a family-oriented fun destination, I’d highly recommend you visit our “neck of the woods”.

While driving I was smiling. 🙂 “Look at all the families here celebrating life together!” Thank you Branson, MO for doing your part in the global attempt to slow the spread. And a BIG thank you to Dunkin Donuts for the yummy sugar-free raspberry latte (B.T.W. when asked if business was slowing down, the young man declared, “It’s just the opposite! Apparently everyone needs donuts!” Well,..duh.

It makes perfect sense that some of the theaters have temporarily closed. YET, some of them remain open limiting their seating capacity and/or distancing the guest seating. Bravo! Lucky for us, there are miniature golf courses nearly on every block of the strip. Thank you to the tons of visitors that are spreading good cheer, despite their change in plans! If you choose to throw caution “to the wind”, health officials across the country still urge visitors to be informed, wise, and WORSH THOSE HANDS! (I’m using my southern and proud SW lingo to emphasize) 😏

Speaking of wind…there was a beautiful southern warm wind blowing in SW MO today. And the trees and I did not keep our distance. Their arms reached out to me and gave me a healthy embrace.

In the park, picnics were being enjoyed by many (tables just the perfect distance 😁), hammocks were hanging in the forest, and children laughing and playing. Simply put, nature is a healer!

If you believe in the power of prayer, remember all of the workers without a job. With businesses slower than usual, unemployment will be very high. My heart and prayers go to everyone not able to make an income during these times.

Have faith💚

“Homing in”

Owning a home is a blessing…..isn’t it? When I reflect on my past homes I vividly recall the tremendous efforts I made towards “perfection”. The home was a direct reflection of me (I was messier at times than the house). I took pride in every room~particularly the kitchen, my favorite spot. My boys needed to love their home. There was comfort there. Despite earthly turmoils and heartaches at times, there were also periods of peace, laughter, and love. ❣

“For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, and eternal house in heaven, not built by human hands.”

2 Corinthians 5:1

If you’re familiar with my essays, or my life, you understand the shifting sands I’ve experienced. And I know for a fact a home cannot be built on shifting sand. I’m not the first, nor the last, to experience it (shift happens).

To avoid confusion between “honing in” and “homing in” I’ll use them in examples: Definitely, I’ve been honing my skills (honing as “sharpening”) through years of valleys and peaks. And now, once again, I’m homing in on my summer territory once again.

Home~*a place where one lives permanently (noun), *to go or return to one’s place of residence or origin (verb), and my favorite verb meaning~*to return by instinct to its territory after leaving it.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Living tiny in a big world

Owning something brings pride. Particularly if you have invested your own sweat, blood, and tears. Ownership is coupled with great responsibility. And after years of shifting and believing that I had finally found “home”, I was ready to downsize and find what fits “me”.

Perhaps the years of walking halls, traveling in the summers, and dreaming big inspired my “nomadic” tendencies (or a born gypsy?). Becoming overly practical and simple supported my healing. It was 5 years ago I was determined I could live “tiny”. Everything I owned fit in a 50 sq. ft. storage unit (still does).

Living in an R.V. definitely has its positive and negatives. Just as owning a home. Should I rent or buy? I almost sold my R.V. (taking down the “For Sale” sign is a good thing for now). For the last 18 months I’ve dreamed of my tiny home. I walked into the office of a local log cabin builder and asked, “Can you build me a tiny log home….on wheels?” A local bank was willing to give me a personal loan IF I placed 50% down. Unfortunately, there are those who might have an Uncle Frank (take no offense Franks) who decides to build a shed (not at all compliant with ANSI or R.V.I.A. codes), put it on a “shifty” trailer, and call it a park model or tiny home. There are many building codes, zoning, and regulations tripping up tiny home owners. Furthermore, you have to have SOMEWHERE to place it. It’s WAY easier to get an R.V. loan than a park model or tiny home (typical salesman: “I’d love for you to buy that $60,000.00 rig for huge interest although we know it will depreciate $10,000 as soon as you drive it off the lot~much like cars”). I won’t stop dreaming of a tiny dwelling. But in the meantime, I’ll enjoy NOT paying mortgage and property taxes and being responsible for anything that could go monstrously wrong with anything bigger than my 34 ft. Rockwood Windjammer. For now, it’s still safe and practical. But I won’t stop dreaming of my tiny home.

“For the record, I have to be in a position to travel to see my amazing grown sons, daughter-in-law’s, and now, the newest loves in my life–GRANDCHILDREN! I guess between J and I we will need at least 4 tiny homes to hold possible grandchildren vacays.”

Grammy K

I’m home in Missouri. Nestled in the rolling hills near lakes and lots of activity, Branson is a great family-friendly place. But truly home is where I “make it”. And homing in at the campground for a season brings me peace. Nothing else to me beats sitting around the campfire with my fellow workkampers. They are family to me. We are a like-minded outdoorsy kind-of tribe who enjoy fires, the outdoors, the ins & outs of R.V. living, and meeting other travelers. We’ve become “ok” to the things that aren’t as “easy” (emptying black and grey tanks, going to the laundrymat, keeping propane filled, etc….). Perhaps it builds our grit while keeping us humble?

One day wheels might take us to a new home, possibly West. But I don’t spend my time worrying. In the meantime, after this season ends, I’ll think about how to hunker down next winter. Our families are here and they need us. And when I need to jet off to one of my own children or grandchildren, I won’t have have anything but a “tiny” place to leave. Workkamping boosts my spirits, energy, and wallet. Last night I visited with some fellow workkampers, both in their 70’s, who had decided to dwell in a condo for the winter. They agreed that their money will be more well-spent on memories. For some of us, we chose this life. And for some, me included, life kind of chose it for us and we found it to be our “home”.

Wherever you are I hope you “home in” on the most important things in your life.

Have faith. 💚